Jay Hodges

Couples in love often have names for each other that can be called terms of endearment. One of the common terms of endearment is, “Honey.” Linda calls me “Sweetie,” and I often call her “Sugar,” but most of the time we just call each other by our names.

My former father-in-law called his wife “Runt,” possibly because she was only five feet tall, but they both recognized the name as endearing. My dad often called my mom “Darling,” but I’ve noticed that term is not used so much anymore.

Nicknames are often terms of endearment. Among men we often call each other, “Buddy.” I have a brother who we called “Bud.” I’m not sure how he got the nickname, but we would call him “Budro” as well as just Bud. We don’t call him that anymore.

I’ve known people with nicknames that I just could not bring myself to use. I knew a guy who was known as “Buzz,” but after he turned forty years old I just could not call him that anymore. A woman in one of my churches was called, “Doodle,” and when I first met her I was aware of her real name. Not feeling like I knew her well enough, I called her by her real name, “Magdalena.” She frowned at me and said, “Never call me that again; my name is ‘Doodle.’” I couldn’t blame her for preferring her nickname.

In both Isaiah and in Revelation the Scripture tells us that God will give us a new name — a term of endearment — when we come into the relationship with God that we were meant to have. When Peter told Jesus that he was “the Christ, the son of the living God,” Jesus replied, “From this day on you will be known as ‘Peter, the Rock, and on this rock I will build my church.” 

Before that time he was known as Cephas.

This Valentine season, when you use a term of endearment for someone you love, remember as well that God loves you, and the term of endearment God uses for you comes right from the heart of God.

Dr. Jay Hodges can be reached at Jayhodges610@yahoo.com.

 

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