Jay Hodges

My friend, Bobby Peoples, recently wrote an article about fishing in hot weather, and he said that to avoid the worst heat, some fishermen fish at night. I cannot remember fishing at night (except for and occasional crappie fishing night) before I moved to Milledgeville. Larry Mullis invited me to go with him one evening, and I loved it.

Fishing at night means finding good dock lights and casting around the light in the water. Mayflies and other night bugs fall in the water around the lights, and bream eat them up. Under the bream, you can often find crappie, and down near the bottom, there will often be bass and catfish. Lights on deepwater docks are best.

Bobby cautioned night fishermen who cast lures toward the dock to be careful not to cast the lure onto the dock or toward boats— especially not in the boats. Well, you need to remember that you are casting at night and it is hard to judge distance. I have cast a few lures that landed on a dock and hung up on something.

I face a dilemma all fishermen face at that point. Do I break off the line and leave the lure on the dock? If I do, someone could get hurt, especially if there are exposed hooks. Or do I get out of my boat onto the dock (trespassing) and retrieve the lure so that anyone coming out on the dock is safe?

In the past, I have gotten out of my boat onto a dock to retrieve a lure, but I have done so as quickly as possible. 

We fishermen need to remember that a dock light that is on is an invitation to catch fish, but respect on our part for the property is of utmost importance. A lot of people are not turning on dock lights anymore, and it might be because we have abused the privilege.

The Apostle Paul said, “The wages of sin is death,” and when we violate others, we can expect recompense. This holds for a lot of other situations as well.

—Dr. Jay Hodges can be reached at Jayhodges610@yahoo.com.

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