The Union Recorder

Local News

December 8, 2009

Sallie Ellis Davis House receives two grants

The Community Foundation of Central Georgia has awarded two $10,000 grants to help fund the restoration of the historic Sallie Ellis Davis House.

Georgia College & State University was awarded a $10,000 grant from the CFCG Responsive Grant Program and officials are currently organizing a campaign to raise $25,000 to begin the preservation of the historic house.

The GCSU Foundation and the Sallie Ellis Davis Foundation plan to renovate and transform the deteriorated structure into an African-American Cultural Center. A partnership of the two foundations was formed last year after the historic building was placed on The Georgia Trust’s list of “Places in Peril” thanks to a nomination by Milledgeville MainStreet.

Garbutt Christman Construction and GCSU donated their time to a work day Saturday — lifting the historic house for initial construction of its new foundation. Media Relations Manager Judy Bailey said the project a two-fold.

“This is a great way to remember and memorialize [Sallie Davis],” Bailey said, “and this is a good way to educate young African-American students when they have no other way. [Sallie Davis] made a difference and they can, too.”

According to a press release, CFCG President Kathryn Dennis said the African-American cultural arts center will fit right in Milledgeville’s rich and vibrant historic district — becoming a great resource for K-12 students, college students and visitors.

The Knight Fund for Milledgeville, a component fund of the CFCG, awarded the second $10,000 grant. According to a press release on the grants the foundation is allowed to give nonprofit organizations grants up to $15,000 because of generous citizens who established unrestricted funds, according to Dennis. The CFCG Board of Directors is given the gumption to award grants to middle Georgia communities having the most urgent needs and opportunities because of consummated funds.

Currently, $40,000 has been donated toward the project to stabilize the 120-year-old house. The estimated cost of the project is more than $370,000. Garbutt estimates that 60 to 90 days are needed for stabilizing the house before renovations can initiate.

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