The Union Recorder

January 29, 2013

MPD seeing high property crime volume

From staff reports
The Union-Recorder

MILLEDGEVILLE —  

The Milledgeville Police Department is concerned with the growing rate of property crimes. According to Maj. Reginald Hill, this month alone has set a trend that is serious and should not be taken lightly by the community. 

Hill said the one factor that would help law enforcement is community vigilance. 

“If you see something that doesn't quite look right, usually your instincts are correct,” Hill said. 

Criminals tend to have patterns developed over the course of their careers. 

“I say careers because as a law-abiding citizen gets up and go to work, earning an honest dollar, criminals prey upon those people as if it were their jobs,” Hill said.

The best way to combat this activity is by making certain that everything of value is locked and secure. 

Something as simple as leaving the car door unlocked could cause a resident to be a victim. It is never a good idea to store valuable items or firearms in vehicles left unattended. Residents can also help themselves by locking all doors not in use.

From the end of December 2012 to January, property crime has spiked. 

The harder criminals have to work, the less interested they are in working for it, according to Hill. 

For the month of January alone, there have been 10 burglaries reported to the police department. Out of the 10 reported, a couple were commercial burglaries causing serious damage to the business. 

There has been a recent increase in auto thefts in the city as well, according to police. Eight thefts of automobiles have been reported. 

Out of the eight, six have been recovered and returned to the owner(s). The two still missing are:

n 1998 Dodge Caravan, Purple, Ga. Tag # WWA 2068  (stolen from South Warren Street)

n 1995 Chevrolet Cavalier, Blue, Vin#1G1JC5249S7111738

Anyone with any information on the vehicles or other cases is urged to call the Milledgeville Police Department Tip Line at (478) 414-4413 or MPD communications at (478)414-4091.